QB3 Seminar: "Research in Space to Benefit Life on Earth," Liz Warren & Miki Sode, Center for the Advancement of Science in Space

Have you thought about the effect of gravity’s influence on your research? Gravity is a controlled variable on the International Space Station. Many researchers, biotech and pharmaceutical companies and entrepreneurs have been conducting breakthrough research on the ISS National Lab to take advantage of its unique environment. Liz Warren and Miki Sode from Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) will present opportunities available for you to bring your science and innovation to higher potential, located 250 miles above Earth. Come join us on August 10th to learn more and start thinking about what science you would do onboard the ISS NL.

Where and When

Noon to 1:00 PM, Thursday, August 10

Room N-114, Genentech Hall, UCSF Mission Bay

Eventbrite - QB3 Seminar: "Research in Space to Benefit Life on Earth," Miki Sode & Liz Warren, CASIS

About the Speakers

 Liz Warren, Ph.D., Associate Program Scientist, CASIS

Liz Warren, Ph.D., Associate Program Scientist, CASIS

Liz was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, and attended the University of California at Davis for both her undergraduate and doctoral degrees in physiology. For her doctoral work, she investigated the effects of gravity as a continuum on energy balance in rats. She completed post-doctoral work in the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Laboratory of Cell Growth, and the Neuroscience Laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. She performed a variety of roles at NASA, including serving as Deputy Project Scientist for the NASA Bed Rest and Artificial Gravity Projects. Liz also spent several years as an Operations Lead in Mission Control for the ISS Medical Project. She joined CASIS in June of 2016. Liz enjoys travel, running, and learning to play the ukulele.

 Miki Sode, Ph.D., Commercial Innovation Program Manager, CASIS

Miki Sode, Ph.D., Commercial Innovation Program Manager, CASIS

Miki combines her multi-disciplinary background and passion for space to advocate for utilizing the orbital environment to advance science and technology. Her curiosity about nature, particularly gravity (and the lack thereof), drove her to obtain a BA in Physics from UC Berkeley, a MS in Aerospace Engineering from San Jose State University and a Ph.D. in Bioengineering from UCSF & Berkeley's joint program. It was her work on bone loss in astronauts while at NASA Ames Research Center that motivated her to pursue her doctoral work on imaging and analysis of trabecular bone structure due to varying mechanical loading. Miki spent several years as a scientist at a clinical research organization helping pharmaceutical companies run clinical trials for FDA approval, mainly for therapeutics for musculoskeletal systems. Born in Tokyo, Japan, Miki calls the San Francisco Bay Area her home. Miki enjoys cooking, baking, arts & craft, skiing, and ballet, but most of all, spending time with her family to explore more of the beautiful Bay Area.