Staying Younger Longer 2.0

As we age, our minds and bodies degenerate. Older people suffer pain, can't enjoy the activities they used to, forget things, and aren't as sharp mentally as younger people. But what if it were possible to slow this general decline and improve the quality of life for the aging? We would live in a happier and more productive society.

In recent years, QB3 has increasingly focused on aging-related disease. We've brought scientists together from Bay Area universities and the private sector. We want to spark productive collaborations that lead to understanding the process of aging and, ultimately, solutions to help all of us. This October, we've invited key players in the field to join us at an afternoon symposium at UCSF Mission Bay.

If you would like to learn about new research, meet leading scientists, connect to investors, and be a part of an exciting group that identifies and tackles one of the most important problems facing us today, please attend this symposium. Space is limited!

Slides

Susanna Rosi: Treatment Strategies to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive and Behavioral Deficits after Brain Injury

Agenda


1:00 - 1:15 PM Registration

1:15 - 1:20 PM Reg Kelly (QB3): Introduction

Session I: Recent developments in understanding aging suggest that anti-aging therapies are on the horizon.

1:20 - 1:50 PM Eric Verdin (Buck Institute): "Therapy and Diagnostic Development at the Buck Institute"

1:50 - 2:10 PM Tony Wyss-Coray (Stanford): "Aging Factors in the Blood"

2:10 - 2:30 PM Susanna Rosi (UCSF): "Stress-Induced Acceleration of the Aging Process"

2:30 - 3:00 PM Coffee Break

Session II: To bring theory into practice we need biomarkers to predict disease, quantify disease progression and stratify age-related diseases.

3:00 - 3:20 PM Ron Kohanski (National Institute on Aging): "Biomarker Research"

3:20 - 3:35 PM Ben Kamens (Spring Discovery): "Applying AI Techniques to Data Analysis of Aging Biomarkers"


3:35 - 3:50 PM Kimberly Scearce-Levie (Denali Therapeutics): "Neurofilament as a Clinical Biomarker of Progression and Response"


3:50 - 4:05 PM Eric Morgen (BIOAGE): "From Longevity Biomarkers to Drug Targets"

Session III: We need to decide on the next steps to be taken for aging biomarkers.

4:05 - 5:15 PM Panel discussion: Supporting biomarker development for aging-related diseases. Moderator: Joe Betts-LaCroix (Vium)

  • Laura Deming (Longevity Fund)

  • Chris Haskell (Bayer)

  • Ron Kohanski (NIA)

  • John Newman (UCSF & Buck)

  • James Peyer (Apollo Ventures)



5:15 - 5:30 PM Reg Kelly: Closing Remarks

5:30 - 7:00 PM Reception

QB3 Seminar: Atessa Chehrazi & Ilana Drummond, Jackson & Hertogs. "US Immigration Policy for Life Science Employees and Entrepreneurs"

More than half of the startups in the QB3 network were founded by entrepreneurs not born in the US. And many startups hire foreign scientists because of their specialized skills. But the procedures for applying for visas, which have never been simple, have become more complicated of late. To learn more about how executive orders, and recent bills introduced in Congress, may affect your company’s hiring or your own employment prospects—and to get a refresher on the US immigration system—join us to hear from Atessa Chehrazi and Ilana Drummond of the San Francisco immigration law firm Jackson & Hertogs.

Where and When

Room 212, Byers Hall, UCSF Mission Bay (700 4th St., San Francisco)
Noon to 1:00 PM, Tuesday, October 9

About the Speakers

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Atessa Chehrazi has been a partner at Jackson & Hertogs since April 2013 and an associate/senior associate since July 2000. She was previously an associate at Maggio & Kattar in Washington, D.C. from 1996 to 2000. She has held several volunteer roles within the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) during her career. For AILA’s Northern California Chapter, she has served as Chair, Vice-Chair, Treasurer, U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Service (USCIS) liaison. On a national level, Atessa served on AILA’s USCIS Headquarters and Benefits, Administrative Appeals Office (AAO), and Department of Labor (DOL) liaison committee. In addition, Atessa has served on AILA’s Business Immigration Advocacy, Issues, and Due Process & Civil Liberties committees, as well as several conference committees. She has served on both a chapter level and national level as a Customs & Border Protection (CBP) liaison.

Atessa has authored articles published in AILA Handbooks and has presented at national and regional AILA conferences. Atessa has served as a board member of the Iranian American Bar Association Northern California chapter since 2009, served as President of the chapter 2014-2015, and was the chapter honoree at the Bar Association of San Francisco Minority Bar Council annual unity awards event in 2014. She is a member of the National Lawyers Guild and was the NLG Immigration Project’s honoree in 2013.

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Ilana J. Drummond has been the firm’s managing partner since 2004. Having focused her practice exclusively on immigration matters for her entire career, Ilana has developed an expertise in helping large and small corporations address their immigration needs. Ilana has held a number of roles within the AILA organizations over the years, including roles within AILA’s California Service Center Liaison Committee, Distance Learning Committee, L-1 Visa Taskforce, and the USCIS Benefits Liaison Committee. Ilana has been an invited speaker to several national and regional conferences. She recently authored “Hiring International Workers in Today’s Economy: New Challenges and Strategies” to Aspatore’s 2010 edition of Employing International Workers. Ilana has received accolades from several directories to legal counsel, including Martindale-Hubbell® and Chambers USA.

Info session for NSF I-Corps short course

Find out about how participating in a three-evening NSF program known as "I-Corps" can significantly de-risk your startup venture. The program trains attendees to use customer discovery and the Lean LaunchPad method to test your product-market fit. Come to this information to get all your questions answered. This is also an opportunity to find like-minded people who are looking to build a team or join one. See you there!

The course will be held evenings of 10/15 (Mon), 10/17 (Wed), and 10/22 (Mon). Short applications are due October 10. Apply HERE if you already know you want to join the program.

Where and When

Monday, October 8, 4:30 to 6:00 PM
Room 215, Byers Hall, UCSF Mission Bay (1700 4th St.)

Questions? Email gino.segre@ucsf.edu

Fall SBIR Grantwriting Workshop at Berkeley

"How to Write a Winning SBIR Proposal"

When & Where

Location is 177 Stanley Hall, UC Berkeley
All classes are on Wednesdays. Class dates: Oct. 3, Oct. 17, Oct. 24, Nov. 14
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About the Workshop

The chances of your SBIR or STTR proposal getting funded are vastly improved if your proposal is well written and packaged. In fact, many great ideas fail to get funded simply because of poor “grantsmanship.” In addition, first-time applicants are often daunted by the intricacies of the grant submission and review processes, and are unaware that they can improve their chances of getting funded by communicating directly with funding agency program and review staff.

This workshop will help you develop a compelling, well-organized research plan, and explain your ideas in clear, engaging writing that will win over your reviewers. We will focus on the Research Plan sections of NIH and NSF SBIR proposals, and one full session will be devoted to helping you craft your Specific Aims (the most important section of your application). We will also provide guidance on filling out your budget, Biosketch and other forms, and tips on how to most effectively navigate the NIH and NSF application and review processes.

Specific topics to be covered will include:

  • What are SBIRs and STTRs, and which should you apply for?

  • Finding a “home” for your proposal (funding agencies, study sections, and topic-specific funding opportunities)

  • Sussing out your competition

  • Interacting with funding agency staff

  • Developing a logical, fundable Research Plan and assembling your project team

  • Logistics of the application process (electronic submission, deadlines, timelines to funding, agency requirements)

  • Major components of SBIR/STTR Research Plans and what to include in each

  • Facing and conquering the blank page

  • Writing and packaging your proposal for maximum impact

  • How to avoid common mistakes

  • Individualized feedback on your Specific Aims

  • Developing your Budget

  • Filling out forms

  • Review and award processes

  • The workshop will consist of four 3-hour sessions. There will be time during and at the end of each session for class participants to consult with the instructors about their own applications.

Session 1: Introduction to SBIRs and STTRs; identifying appropriate funding agencies and targeted funding announcements; mechanics of applying

Session 2: Developing your Research Plan; grantsmanship and writing tips (i.e., how to best pitch your proposal to your reviewers)

Session 3: Individual feedback from the instructors on your Specific Aims; help with filling out forms

Session 4: The review and award processes and how to maximize your chances of success; resubmissions and Phase II applications

This class is designed for applicants planning to submit for the next NIH and/or NSF grant deadlines (Jan 5, 2019 and early December 2018, respectively). However, the basic principles to be covered also apply to other federal SBIR funding agencies (DoD, DoE, etc.). Importantly, the science writing skills taught in this class will serve you well in writing not only grant applications, but also scientific journal articles and company public relations materials.

Register Now

Please note that if you wish to request a refund we require notice of cancellation 48 hours in advance of the first session.
 

Fee Structure

General Admission: $750
Startup in a Box members: $150

Note: Startup in a Box fee for UC founder: $250, non-UC founder: $350. More information on the program is available here.

Email Ioana Aanei with any questions.

About the Instructor

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Gabrielle G. Leblanc, Ph.D., is a professional grant consultant and writer with 11 years of experience as an NIH Program Director, and many years of prior experience as a research scientist and lab PI. During her academic career, she was an Assistant Professor at Oregon Health Sciences University, where her laboratory studied early nervous system development. As a lab PI, Dr. Leblanc was successful in winning grants from NIH, NSF, and many other government and non-profit funding agencies. As a Program Director at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke at NIH, she oversaw multimillion dollar portfolios of grants and contracts in basic and clinical science, provided grantsmanship advice to scores of both junior and senior investigators, and led major funding initiatives in neuroscience, developmental biology, and genomics. In her subsequent 10 years as a freelance grant consultant/writer, she has provided scientific strategic consulting and grant-writing support to biotechnology industry and university investigators in a wide range of fields, from trypanosome pharmacogenomics to cancer drug development to medical applications of virtual reality. Dr. Leblanc has a B.A. in Biology from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in Neurosciences from Stanford University School of Medicine.

Office Hours: Fundraising. Aria Kashefi, Morrison Foerster

Our office hours are hosted by leading experts who have generously offered their services pro bono to our entrepreneurs.

To hold your slot for this session, we require a $100 credit card deposit. The deposit will be refunded the day after you attend. No-shows will not receive a refund. Please be punctual; arrivals late by more than 15 minutes will be considered no-shows.

If you find that you are unable to attend, you may request a refund up to 48 hours in advance. We regret that we cannot honor requests made at a later time.

Where & When

Suite 214, Byers Hall, UCSF Mission Bay (1700 4th Street, San Francisco)
9:00AM to 12:00PM, Wednesday, October 3

Reserve Your Slot

About the Expert

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Aria Kashefi is an associate in the Palo Alto office of Morrison & Foerster and is a member of the firm’s Corporate Group.

Mr. Kashefi’s practice focuses on emerging company and venture capital financings, mergers and acquisitions of technology companies and other corporate, securities and commercial matters.

Mr. Kashefi earned his B.A.Sc. (with distinction) in mechatronics, robotics and automation from the University of British Columbia in 2008 and received his J.D. from the University of Toronto in 2011, where he served as an Executive Member of the Business Law Students Association. Prior to joining Morrison & Foerster, Mr. Kashefi was an associate at an international law firm headquartered in Canada.

Mr. Kashefi is admitted to practice in California and in Ontario, Canada.

Office Hours: Licensing. Scott Carter, Morrison Foerster

Our office hours are hosted by leading experts who have generously offered their services pro bono to our entrepreneurs.

To hold your slot for this session, we require a $100 credit card deposit. The deposit will be refunded the day after you attend. No-shows will not receive a refund. Please be punctual; arrivals late by more than 15 minutes will be considered no-shows.

If you find that you are unable to attend, you may request a refund up to 48 hours in advance. We regret that we cannot honor requests made at a later time.

Where & When

Suite 214, Byers Hall, UCSF Mission Bay (1700 4th Street, San Francisco)
1:00 PM to 4:45PM, Wednesday, September 26

Reserve Your Slot

About the Expert

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Scott Carter focuses his practice on the life sciences industry, representing life sciences companies and investors in complex transactions relating to the development and commercialization of biotechnology, pharmaceutical, diagnostic, and medical-device products. He has extensive experience negotiating corporate partnership, licensing, research and development, clinical trial, manufacturing, and supply agreements. Dr. Carter also advises clients on the intellectual property aspects of mergers and acquisitions.

Dr. Carter holds a Ph.D. in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology. His research at Caltech centered on non-natural nucleosides, as well as the design, synthesis, and testing of DNA-binding molecules in the laboratory of Peter Dervan.

While at Caltech and law school, Dr. Carter was also the assistant director of the Office of Technology Transfer at Caltech. In this role, he managed the Institute’s life sciences patent portfolio, and negotiated and drafted license, research, and material transfer agreements, as well as advising Caltech entrepreneurs on new ventures.

Dr. Carter is admitted to practice in California and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Fall SBIR Grantwriting Workshop at UCSF

Where & When

Room 1400, Mission Hall, UCSF Mission Bay
All classes are on Tuesdays, 1:00-4:00 pm
Class dates: Sept. 25, Oct. 16, Oct. 23, Nov. 6, Nov. 27, Dec. 18
Scroll down to buy tickets.

About the Workshop

This workshop will take you through all the steps necessary to successfully file a well-written NIH SBIR/STTR grant application for the January 5, 2019 deadline. Taking the workshop you will learn how to craft an appropriate research plan, obtain persuasive letters of support, develop an efficient budget, and anticipate reviewers’ comments. We will help you speed through the application instructions, saving you hours of time. Results from past attendees indicate that taking this course triples your chances of success. The workshop culminates in a submission clinic that will ensure your application is correctly filed.

One or more team members (up to 3) from the company should be prepared to attend every session. Remember to bring your laptop; these will be working sessions.

The course includes six working sessions and a pre-submission review of your Specific Aims page by our course instructors.

(The Oct. 23 class is guest talk & interactive workshop on Specific Aims page)

Topics

  • Understanding the eligibility requirements of an SBIR grant

  • Preparing to apply for an SBIR (company formation, registration at all required websites, identifying the best PI)

  • Assembling all the necessary parts of the application (letters of support, sub-contract quotes and letters, facilities description, research plan, etc.)

  • Strategies for designing your specific aims

  • Budget strategies and restrictions

  • Complete and convincing budget justifications

  • Documentation required to use human samples, human subjects and vertebrate animals

  • What makes a competitive proposal

  • Common mistakes that applicants make

  • Filing in forms and submission process

  • Re-submission if your grant is not funded

  • Phase II SBIR applications

  • Searching for program announcements and finding non-dilutive funding opportunities

Instructors

Shauna Farr-Jones, PhD, UCSF/QB3 grant writer
Ioana Aanei, PhD, Entrepreneurship Program Manager, QB3
Kaspar Mossman, PhD, Director of Marketing & Communications, QB3

Register Now

Please note that if you wish to request a refund we require notice of cancellation 48 hours in advance of the first session.

Fee Structure

General Admission: $750
Startup in a Box members: $150

Note: Startup in a Box fee for UC founder: $250, non-UC founder: $350. More information on the program is available here.

Email Ioana Aanei with any questions.

About the Instructor

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Shauna Farr-Jones, Ph.D., has a record of writing successful government grant and contract proposals on diverse life science topics, providing strategic input on both research and business plans. She has helped companies secure over $200 million in grant and contract funding from numerous government and philanthropic organizations, including BARDA, NIH, DTRA, USDA, DARPA and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. For 17 years, she has consulted for life science companies and universities, identifying funding opportunities, preparing research plans, marketing plans, technical reports INDs, NDAs, white papers and proposals. She is also the Project Manager of the Antibody Technology Research Center at UCSF. Previously, she was Senior Writer at BioCentury Publications, where she analyzed and wrote about the biotechnology industry. She was a post-doctoral fellow at UCSF and has a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Tufts University.

QB3 Seminar: Nick Shenkin, FBI. "IP Piracy in Life Science: Threat Landscape and Defensive Tactics"

For many life science startups, IP is the most crucial factor that determines whether they succeed or fail. An innovative concept and freedom to operate are essential to winning investment.

But hostile foreign and domestic actors want to steal ideas and data from scientists and entrepreneurs. They target the most vulnerable: academics and early-stage companies.

Are you one of these targets? Do you want to know what threats you face and what you can do to protect yourself? Join us on Thursday, September 13 to hear from FBI Special Agent Nicholas Shenkin, Strategic Partnership Coordinator for the FBI’s San Francisco Field Office.

This event is co-hosted with UCSF IT Security.

Where and When

Byers Auditorium, Genentech Hall, UCSF Mission Bay (600 16th St., San Francisco)
Noon to 1:00 PM, Thursday, September 13, 2018

About the Speaker

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Nicholas Shenkin is an FBI Special Agent and Director of the Strategic Technology Taskforce of the FBI, San Francisco Field Division. Nicholas is a Counterintelligence specialist and leads a staff of Special Agents and Intelligence Analysts responsible for hardening the target of 400+ Cleared Defense Contractors, Silicon Valley, U.C. Berkeley, Stanford, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, and all businesses and academic institutions in the San Francisco division. In 1996, prior to his engagement with the Bureau, Nicholas started a web hosting and online security consultancy. Nicholas sold that company in 2002 and became Director and in-house counsel focused on M&A matters and on security compliance issues surrounding HIPAA and SOX. Nicholas is a graduate of UCLA and Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, and is a member of the California Bar.

 

Rosenman D-Series: Russ Branaghan, Research Collective. "Demystifying the FDA’s Human Factors Guidance"

As part of FDA approval, a new medical device must follow guidelines for “Human Factors,” which address design and encompass usability and ergonomics. Because medical devices are so diverse, manufacturers often struggle to understand how the guidelines apply to their own product. At this talk, Dr. Russell Branaghan, Founder/President at Research Collective will describe strategies to help companies (1) improve their time to market and overall design through early implementation of human factors, and (2) pass their human factors validation test for FDA clearance.

Where & When

Room 212, Byers Hall, UCSF Mission Bay (1700 4th St., San Francisco)
Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Agenda

5:00 - 5:30 pm: Networking

5:30 - 6:30 pm: Talk and Q&A

About the Speaker

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Dr. Russell J. Branaghan serves as Founder/President at Research Collective, a Human Factors research firm, specializing in medical devices and healthcare technologies. Russ also serves as Associate Professor of Human Systems Engineering at Arizona State University and is a Visiting Professor of Human Factors in the Master of Product Design and Development Program at Northwestern. Before forming Research Collective, Russ spent 15 years in industry as Sr. Human Factors Engineer at Hewlett-Packard, an Advisory Human Factors Engineer at IBM and held leadership positions at Fitch, Big Red Rooster and Lextant.

QB3 NIH SBIR 2-part workshop for Sept. 5 deadline

Get expert help with your SBIR application from professional grant writer Shauna Farr-Jones so you can submit with confidence for the September 5th NIH SBIR deadline. Join our upcoming short-form workshop: two highly interactive sessions addressing any questions you have regarding content, forms, budget and logistics.

Session 1: 1:00 - 2:30 PM, Tuesday, August 7
Session 2: 1:00 - 2:30 PM, Tuesday, August 21

Both sessions will be held in Room 2110, Mission Hall, 550 16th St., UCSF Mission Bay.

Session 1 will focus on the research plan, budget and justification, bios, facilities, letters, human subjects and vertebrate animals.

Session 2 will cover how to re-submit a rejected application and dealing with forms and submission.

Bring your draft application and email questions to Shauna in advance. The workshop is intended for founders who have already registered their companies at SAM.gov.

About the Instructor

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Shauna Farr-Jones, Ph.D., has a record of writing successful government grant and contract proposals on diverse life science topics, providing strategic input on both research and business plans. She has helped companies secure over $200 million in grant and contract funding from numerous government and philanthropic organizations, including BARDA, NIH, DTRA, USDA, DARPA and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. For 17 years, she has consulted for life science companies and universities, identifying funding opportunities, preparing research plans, marketing plans, technical reports INDs, NDAs, white papers and proposals. She is also the Project Manager of the Antibody Technology Research Center at UCSF. Previously, she was Senior Writer at BioCentury Publications, where she analyzed and wrote about the biotechnology industry. She was a post-doctoral fellow at UCSF and has a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Tufts University.

Better Data, Better Tools, Better Decisions – An Overview of the FDA's Office of Computational Science

FDA’s Office of Computational Science (OCS) provides FDA reviewers at the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) with innovative and reliable solutions that improve and strengthen the scientific review process by integrating data, computational tools, and training. OCS helps reviewers understand, analyze, and use their data so they spend more time thinking about the results of the data analyses rather than setting up those analyses, thereby improving and expediting the review process. Join us on July 31 to hear from OCS scientists and learn how the FDA is leveraging computational tools, services and training into the scientific review process.

Where and When

Room 160, Helen Diller Bldg., UCSF Mission Bay (1450 Third St., San Francisco)
3:00 to 4:00 PM, Tuesday, July 31, 2018

About the Speakers

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Lilliam Rosario, PhD is the Director of the Office of Computational Science (OCS) in the Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. OCS leads and directly supports the modernization of CDER’s scientific review capabilities. OCS innovates tools, technologies, and services specifically for drug product review and then provides these to reviewers at the right time backed up with training and support. Acknowledging that successful review starts with good data, OCS continues to support efforts to regularly achieve high quality data. OCS received the Health and Human Services Secretary’s Award for its work in developing CDER’s JumpStart program, an innovative initiative dedicated to enhancing the efficiency of CDER’s new drug development and review process. OCS continues to innovate and service reviewers as Dr. Rosario has led to the OCS to make real it’s motto: Better data, better tools, better decisions.

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Crystal Allard is the Data Quality Team Lead in the Office of Computational Science at the FDA/CDER where she leads work in study data standards, data management, and business process in support of regulatory review. Crystal also manages all collaborations with the OCS. Crystal has a bachelor’s degree in Biology from Binghamton University and is a current masters student in Information Quality at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. She has worked at the FDA since 2008 and at the OCS since 2012.

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Qais Hatim received a dual Ph.D. degree in operation research and industrial engineering and graduate minors in statistics and high performance computing from Pennsylvania State University/University Park in 2015. In 2015, he also joined FDA. Currently Qais’s main roles as computer scientist/statistician at FDA is conducting research in statistical/operational modeling and computer science as well as supporting other activities at CDER/ Office of Translational Science (OTS)/ Office of Computational Science (OCS) in FDA. In his work, he is utilizing machine learning and data mining algorithms, natural language processing (NLP) techniques, Neural Networks procedures, and Bayesian analytics to extract meaning, patterns and hidden structures in structured and unstructured data. He is active member in several organizations within and outside FDA.

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After 7 years as a PM/BA at a software development company, Matt Steele joined FDA in 2016 as a project lead in FDA’s Office of Computational Science (OCS) for the inspectional and risk based tools. He is currently managing the effort to modernize and improve this suite of tools and is a member of multiple working groups aimed at improving the business processes and technology used across various offices within CDER.

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Kendra Worthy PharmD, is Team Leader, Tools, Technology & Innovation at OCS. She oversees a team that manages the development and maintenance of analytical tools that empower clinical reviewers to conduct their regulatory reviews with greater efficiency.

She was commissioned as a Lieutenant (O-3) in the U.S. Navy and served as a pharmacy manager at National Naval Medical Center during the Global War on Terrorism.  In 2004, she transferred to the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Commissioned Corps as a Drug Utilization Analyst with the Food and Drug Administration Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Office of Surveillance and Epidemiology.  She’s held several leadership positions working in Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) and Medication Errors. As an officer USPHS, Kendra has deployed on missions for Hurricanes Katrina and Ike (both in Baton, Rouge, LA) as well as for the H1N1 Swine Flu outbreak.  She has also assisted the Attending Physician staff at the United States Capitol for State of the Union Addresses for President George W. Bush.

 

The Fifth Annual Rosenman Symposium on Health Technologies

The annual Rosenman Symposium is the premier event for the San Francisco Bay Area's health technology community. Join us to learn from leaders in the health technology industry, meet dynamic startups, and connect with hundreds of players in the Bay Area ecosystem.

For full information and registration, visit the symposium webpage on the Rosenman Institute website.

Agenda

Welcoming Remarks: Sam Hawgood, Chancellor, UCSF

Featured Speakers:

  • Benson Smith, Chairman, Teleflex
  • Tejal Desai, Chair, Department of Bioengineering & Therapeutic Sciences, UC San Francisco
  • Joe DeSimone, CEO & Co-Founder, Carbon
  • Jeffrey Shuren, Director, Center for Devices & Radiological Health, FDA
  • Andrew Thompson, CEO, Proteus Digital Health

 
Panel Discussion: "The Future of Innovation in Health Technologies: Aligning All the Stakeholders"

Moderator: Josh Makower, General Partner, NEA

Panel Members:

  • Tim Homer, VP Health Policy, Market Access & Government Affairs, iRhythm
  • Wende Hutton, General Partner, Canaan Partners
  • Kate Rosenbluth, CEO & Co-Founder, Cala Health
  • Jeffrey Shuren, Director, Center for Devices & Radiological Health, FDA
  • Renee Compton Ryan, VP, Venture Investments, J&J Innovation

 
With presentations by the 10 startup companies selected as the 2018 cohort of the Rosenman Innovators.
 
Reception to follow.

QB3 Seminar: Mickey Urdea, Halteres Associates. "Why Do Diagnostics Companies Fail?"

Over the last decade, several diagnostics companies that initially appeared to be on a path to success ultimately failed. The Gates Foundation asked a diagnostics consulting firm, Halteres Associates, to study the phenomenon. Classifying 28 companies as "Successes," "Failures," and "Zombies," the firm found that key indicators of success or failure emerged as companies drove their concepts toward commercialization. Want to get the details? Join us on May 15 to hear from Mickey Urdea, a diagnostics entrepreneur and founding partner at Halteres. Download the slide deck

Where & When

Room 212, Byers Hall, UCSF Mission Bay (1700 4th Street, San Francisco)
12:00 to 1:00 PM, Tuesday, May 15

About the Speaker

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Dr. Mickey Urdea is Founder and Partner for Halteres Associates. He also founded and served as Chief Executive Officer of Tethys Bioscience, a proteomics-based diagnostics company that has been involved in the prevention of type-2 diabetes (assets acquired by HDL), and was CEO of Quantum Dots Corporation (assets acquired by Life Technologies). Additionally, Dr. Urdea is a founder and the Chairman of Catalysis Foundation for Health (CFH), a non-profit organization addressing gaps in global healthcare caused by inefficiencies in disease diagnosis and monitoring; CFH is developing potential biomarkers for tuberculosis bacterial load with a grant for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Dr. Urdea is a member of the University of California at San Francisco Leadership Council for Global Health. He serves as a consultant to the life sciences industry and is on the scientific advisory boards and boards of directors of a number of biotechnology and diagnostics companies. Prior to his current activities, Dr. Urdea founded the Nucleic Acid Diagnostics business at Chiron Corporation, where he pioneered viral load assays for the human hepatitis B, hepatitis C and immunodeficiency viruses; his team introduced the first commercial viral load assays for all three viruses. Dr. Urdea also headed the Oncology Diagnostics business unit at Chiron. He then became business head of the Molecular Diagnostics group and Chief Scientific Officer at Bayer Diagnostics. He has served as an advisor to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for over ten years. Dr. Urdea is an author on over 200 peer-reviewed scientific publications and has more than 125 issued and pending patents. He received his BS in Biology and Chemistry from Northern Arizona University, his PhD in Biochemistry from Washington State University, and had an NIH postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California at San Francisco.

Office Hours: Legal Help on Immigration in Life Science. Atessa Chehrazi & Robert Herreria, Jackson & Hertogs

Life science startups need talented employees with specialized skills--who are not necessarily US citizens or permanent residents. And US immigration law is continually in flux. If you're a Bay Area life scientist who needs legal advice on your status, or an employer seeking how to hire or retain a foreign scientist, these office hours are for you. Sign up for a 30-minute, one-on-one introductory session with lawyers Atessa Chehrazi and Robert Herreria of the San Francisco immigration firm Jackson & Hertogs. This session will be a pro bono consult, with the legal advice and relationship limited to the clinic and based on the limited information provided.

Our office hours are hosted by leading experts who have generously offered their services pro bono to our entrepreneurs.

To hold your slot for this session, we require a $100 credit card deposit. The deposit will be refunded the day after you attend. No-shows will not receive a refund. Please be punctual; arrivals late by more than 15 minutes will be considered no-shows.

If you find that you are unable to attend, you may request a refund up to 48 hours in advance. We regret that we cannot honor requests made at a later time.

Where and When

Suite 214, Byers Hall, UCSF Mission Bay (1700 4th Street, San Francisco)
9:00 AM to 12:00 PM, Friday, May 4

Reserve Your Slot

About the Experts

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Atessa Chehrazi has been a partner at Jackson & Hertogs since April 2013 and an associate/senior associate since July 2000. She was previously an associate at Maggio & Kattar in Washington, D.C. from 1996 to 2000. She has held several volunteer roles within the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) during her career. For AILA’s Northern California Chapter, she has served as Chair, Vice-Chair, Treasurer, U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Service (USCIS) liaison, and Customs & Border Protection (CBP) liaison. On a national level, Atessa served on AILA’s USCIS Headquarters and Benefits, Administrative Appeals Office (AAO), and Department of Labor (DOL) liaison committee. In addition, Atessa has served on AILA’s Business Immigration Advocacy, Issues, and Due Process & Civil Liberties committees, as well as several conference committees. She has authored articles published in AILA Handbooks and has presented at national and regional AILA conferences. Atessa has served as a board member of the Iranian American Bar Association Northern California chapter since 2009, served as President of the chapter 2014-2015, and was the chapter honoree at the Bar Association of San Francisco Minority Bar Council annual unity awards event in 2014. She is a member of the National Lawyers Guild and was the NLG Immigration Project’s honoree in 2013. Atessa has been highly reviewed in legal directories, including selection as a Northern California “Super Lawyer” (2010-2012, 2015-2017), and listing in the International Who’s Who of Corporate Immigration Lawyers (2011-2015).

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Robert L. Herreria joined Jackson & Hertogs as an Associate in January 2016. He has over eight years of experience in U.S. immigration law as an attorney and case manager with business and employment immigration firms, as well as in internships with the U.S. Executive Office for Immigration Review and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Robert has represented a wide range of small, medium, and large businesses, corporations, and organizations in identifying and executing efficient and effective immigration strategies for critical hires and valued employees. He has experience advising employers on nonimmigrant and permanent residence cases as well as immigration workplace compliance and related issues. He has also written articles on U.S. immigration topics including family and employment-based immigration and was previously a contributing editor for “Fiancé & Marriage Visas: A Couple’s Guide to U.S. Immigration”, published by Nolo.com. Robert has been admitted to practice law in California since 2011. He is a graduate of the University of San Diego School of Law and is an active AILA member.

Rosenman D-Series: David Kim, DigiTx Partners. "Investing Insights in Digital Health"

Digital health is a sector of the health ecosystem that has enormous growth potential. What’s really piquing investors’ interest these days? Are there any special factors that make certain digital health companies more attractive than others? What trends are emerging, and what major unmet needs are still crying out for a solution that would bring investors running? Join us on May 1 to get answers from David Kim of the investment firm DigiTx Partners.

Where & When

Room N-114, Genentech Hall, UCSF Mission Bay (600 16th Street, San Francisco)
5:00 to 6:30 PM, Tuesday, May 1

Agenda

5:00 - 5:30 pm: Networking
5:30 - 6:30 pm: Talk and Q&A

About the Speaker

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David is the CEO of DigiTx Partners, bringing both business and clinical expertise to venture capital with an extensive background practicing medicine and building healthcare software companies. Most recently, Dr. Kim served as the COO of Lumiata, a venture-backed predictive analytics company positioned at the intersection of data science and medical science. Prior to Lumiata, he spent over a decade as an investor evaluating and growing healthcare companies at MPM Capital and Pinnacle Ventures. Before entering the business sector, David practiced as a general internist and hospitalist at Kaiser South San Francisco where he also served as the Director of Urgent Care and Assistant Chief of Internal Medicine. David completed his internal medicine residency at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and is a graduate from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (M.D), Stanford Graduate School of Business (M.B.A.), and Pomona College (B.A., Biology). In addition to leading the DigiTx fund, David serves as an active advisor to the Catalyst Program within the UCSF Clinical & Translational Science Institute.